Tuesday, 21 June 2011

Some common NFS errors:


  1. The rpcbind failure Error. The following example shows the message that appears on the client
    system during the boot process or in response to an explicit mount request:
    • nfs mount: server1:: RPC: Rpcbind failure
      RPC: Timed Out
      nfs mount: retrying: /mntpoint
The error in accessing the server is due to:
    • The combination of an incorrect Internet address and a correct host or node name in the hosts database file supporting the client node.
    • The hosts database file that supports the client has the correct server node, but the server node temporarily stops due to an overload.
To solve the rpcbind failure error condition when the server node is operational, determine if the server is out of critical resources (for example, memory, swap, or disk space).
 
  1. The server not responding Error The following message appears during the boot process or in response to an explicit mount request, and this message indicates a known server that is inaccessible.
NFS server server2 not responding, still trying
 Possible causes for the server not responding error are:
    • The network between the local system and the server is down. To verify that the network is down, enter the ping command (ping server2).
    •  The server ( server2) is down.
       
The NFS client fails a reboot Error. If you attempt to boot an NFS client and the client-node stops, waits, and echoes the following message:
Setting default interface for multicast: add net 224.0.0.0: gateway:
client_node_name.
these symptoms might indicate that a client is requesting an NFS mount using an entry in the /etc/vfstab file, specifying a foreground mount from a non-operational NFS server.

To solve this error, complete the following steps:
1. To interrupt the failed client node press Stop-A, and boot the client into single-user mode.
2. Edit the /etc/vfstab file to comment out the NFS mounts.
3. To continue booting to the default run level (normally run level 3), press Control-D.
4. Determine if all the NFS servers are operational and functioning properly.
5. After you resolve problems with the NFS servers, remove the comments from the /etc/vfstab file.

Note – If the NFS server is not available, an alternative to commenting out
the entry in the /etc/vfstab file is to use the bg mount option so that the
boot sequence can proceed in parallel with the attempt to perform the NFS mount.
 
  1. The service not responding ErrorThe following message appears during the boot process or in response to an explicit mount request, and indicates that an accessible server is not running the NFS server daemons.

nfs mount: dbserver: NFS: Service not responding
nfs mount: retrying: /mntpoint
To solve the service not responding error condition, complete the following steps:
    1.  Enter the who -r command on the server to see if it is at run level 3. If the server is not, change to run level 3 by entering the init 3 command.
    2. Enter the ps -e command on the server to check whether the NFS server daemons are running. If they are not, start them by using the /etc/init.d/nfs.server start script.
       
  1. The program not registered Error. The following message appears during the boot process or in response to an explicit mount request and indicates that an accessible server is not running the mountd daemon.
nfs mount: dbserver: RPC: Program not registered
nfs mount: retrying: /mntpoint
To solve the program not registered error condition, complete the following steps:
    1.  Enter the who -r command on the server to check that it is at run level 3. If the server is not, change to run level 3 by performing the init 3 command.
    2.  Enter the pgrep -xl mountd command. If the mountd daemon is not running, start it using the /etc/init.d/nfs.server script, first with the stop flag and then with the start flag.
    3.  Check the /etc/dfs/dfstab file entries.
       
  1. The stale NFS file handle Error. The following message appears when a process attempts to access a
    remote file resource with an out-of-date file handle.  A possible cause for the stale NFS file handle error is that the file resource on the server moved. To solve the stale NFS file handle error condition, unmount and mount the resource again on the client.
     
  2. The unknown host Error. The following message indicates that the host name of the server on the client is missing from the hosts table.
nfs mount: sserver1:: RPC: Unknown host
To solve the unknown host error condition, verify the host name in the hosts database that supports the client node. Note – The preceding example misspelled the node name server1 as sserver1.
 
  1. The mount point Error. The following message appears during the boot process or in response to
    an explicit mount request and indicates a non-existent mount point.
mount: mount-point /DS9 does not exist.
To solve the mount point error condition, check that the mount point exists on the client. Check the spelling of the mount point on the command line or in the /etc/vfstab file on the client, or comment out
the entry and reboot the system.
 
  1. The no such file Error. The following message appears during the boot process or in response to
    an explicit mount request, which indicates that there is an unknown file
    resource name on the server.
     
  2. No such file or directory To solve the no such file error condition, check that the directory exists
    on the server. Check the spelling of the directory on the command line or in the /etc/vfstab file.

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